Dark City Director's Cut - (Region A Import Blu-ray Disc)

Write a review


R 215

eB2 150

Discovery Miles  2 150

Shipped in 10 to 12 working days

When do I get it?

Prepaid codes are delivered to you via email as soon as payment has been approved.

When do I get it?

Once payment has been approved, purchased eBooks are added to your Digital Library, ready for you to download.

When do I get it?

Gift vouchers are delivered via email to the recipient as soon as payment has been approved.

Of course you want to know — When do I get it?


We strive at all times to get it to you on time but here are some indications:

If we say In Stock, we dispatch within the time frame of the shipping plan you selected.

If we say In Stock (You can also collect in cpt), the stock is available from our Cape Town warehouse and you can collect on the same working day if your payment has been authorised and you collect before 5pm.

If we say dispatched between X and Y days then it takes X to Y days to receive from a supplier and it will then be with you within the time frame of the shipping plan you selected.

If we say Pre-order it means that your item will be dispatched to you on the day it's released and arrive with the time span of the shipping plan you chose.

And then there's the Weekend. In order to receive goods on the weekend, select our weekend delivery option when checking out.

If this is all too confusing, call us on 087 362 8000 or send an e-mail to info@takealot.com. One of our friendly employees will get back to you pronto.


Free Exchanges & Returns for 30 days. Learn more

Free Exchanges & Returns for 30 Days


Returns

If you are not completely satisfied with your purchase, simply return the items to us in their original condition and packaging within 30 days of receipt and we will issue a credit which can be used to place a new order.

Exchanges (Fashion, sportswear and shoes only)

Wrong size? Don't quite like the colour? You can exchange your purchased item for a different size and/or colour up to 30 days from the day you received it, completely free of charge.

The item must be unworn and unused (other than trials) with the original tags still attached. Packaging should be returned in an undamaged condition with the item

When does this policy not apply?

If the item is:
  • older than 30 days
  • opened, unsealed, used or missing any accessories
  • a digital product such as an eBook, electronic voucher, gaming code or other digital download;
  • an audio or video recording or computer software that has been unsealed;
  • a newspaper, periodical or magazine;
  • a foodstuff, beverage, or other product intended for everyday consumption;
  • a nursing or maternity product that has been unsealed, including (but not limited to) breast pumps, bottles, formula, maternity underwear, nappies and wipes;
  • a beauty product or fragrance which has been used; or
  • a product which has been personalised for you or made to your specifications.

Find out more about Exchanges & Returns


  • This DVD requires an NTSC (American) compatible TV.
  • This Blu-ray disc requires a suitable Blu-ray player that has the ability to play multi region discs.
A man wakes up with no memory, and can't remember why he is being pursued by police for a string of murders, and by strange telekinetic beings bent on killing him.
Categories
DramaSci-FiImportMovies
Rating
UN
Number of Discs
1
Format
Blu-ray
TV System
NTSC
Country
USA
Region
  1. A
Barcode
794043122927
Title
Dark City Director's Cut - (Region A Import Blu-ray Disc)
Studio
Warner Home Video
Year
1998
Running Time
111

Victor, South Africa. 4 June 2014

A Beautiful and Generous Movie
"Dark City" by Alex Proyas resembles its great silent predecessor "Metropolis" in asking what it is that makes us human, and why it cannot be changed by decree. Both films are about false worlds created to fabricate ideal societies, and in both the machinery of the rulers is destroyed by the hearts of the ruled. Both are parables in which a dangerous weapon attacks the order of things: a free human who can see what really is, and question it. "Dark City" contains a threat more terrible than any of the horrors in "Metropolis," because the rulers of the city can control the memories of its citizens; if we are the sum of all that has happened to us, then what are we when nothing has happened to us?
In "Dark City", all of the human memories are newly fabricated when the hands of the clock reach 12. This is defined as "midnight," but the term is deceptive, because there is no noon. "First came darkness, then came the Strangers," we are told in the opening narration. In the beginning, there was no light. John Murdoch, the hero, asks Bumstead, the police detective: "When was the last time you remember doing something during the day?" Bumstead is surprised by the question. "You know something?" Murdoch asks him. "I don't think the sun even exists in this place. I've been up for hours and hours, and the night never ends here."
The narration explains that the Strangers came from another galaxy and collected a group of humans to study them. Their civilization is dying. They seek to find the secret of the human heart, or soul, or whatever it is that falls outside their compass. They create a vast artificial city, which can be fabricated, or "tuned," whenever they want to run another experiment.
We see the tuning taking place. All humans lose consciousness. All machinery stops. Changes are made in the city. Skyscrapers are extruded from the primordial materials of the underworld, architecture is devised, rooms are prepared for their inhabitants, props are set in place. Aided by a human scientist, the Strangers inject memories into the foreheads of their test subjects. When humans awaken, they have no memory of the day before; everything they remember has been injected from a communal memory bank. If a man commits murder one day and then is given a new identity, is he still capable of committing murder? Are men inherently good or evil, or is it a matter of how they think of themselves? The Strangers need to know.
Murdoch (Rufus Sewell) has developed an immunity to the devices of the Strangers. His latest memory injection was incomplete. It was administered by Dr. Schreber (Kiefer Sutherland), a scientist who works for the Strangers but has no love for them. Murdoch wakes in a hotel room with the corpse of a dead woman; the script for the day has made him a serial killer of prostitutes. Schreber warns him he is the subject of an experiment but has proven resistant to it. The Strangers are coming for him, and he must flee.

That sets the story into motion: Murdoch wanders through the city, trying to discover its underlying nature; Detective Bumstead (William Hurt) tries to capture him, but will gradually be won over by Murdoch's questions (he is programmed as a cop, but not a very good one; he keeps complaining, "no one ever listens to me"). Then there is the torch singer, Emma (Jennifer Connelly), who remembers that she is John's wife and loves him, and that they met at Shell Beach. Everyone says they know how to go to Shell Beach. But no one seems able to say exactly where it is.

The Strangers occupy the bodies of human corpses. Most of them are tall; one is in a child's body but is no child. The alien beings themselves, living inside the corpses, look like spiders made of frightened noodles. They can levitate, they can change the matter of the city at will, they have a hive insect organization, they gather in a subterranean cavern to collectively retune the city.

This is not only a beautiful film but a generous one, which supplies rich depth and imagination and many more details than are really necessary to tell the story. The world created by the Strangers seems borrowed from 1940s film noir; we see fedoras, cigarettes, neon signs, automats, older cars (and some newer ones -- the world is not consistent).

I believe more than ever that "Dark City" is one of the great modern films.

The emotions of "Dark City" emerges in its love stories. At a crucial point, John Murdoch tells Emma, "Everything you remember, and everything I'm supposed to remember, never really happened." Emma doesn't think that can be true. "I so vividly remember meeting you," she says. "I remember falling in love with you." Yes, she remembers. But this is the first time they have met. "I love you, John," she says. "You can't fake something like that." And Murdoch says, "No, you can't." You can inform someone who they love, and that is what the Strangers have done with their memory injection. But what she feels cannot be injected. That is the part the strangers do not understand. Emma has a small role but it is at the heart of the movie, because she truly knows love; John has still to discover it -- to learn about it from her.
The Strangers are not evil. They simply proceed from alien assumptions. They are not even all-powerful, which is why Murdoch, Bumstead and Schreber have relative freedom to move about the city. At the end, we feel a little sorry for them. They will die surrounded by happy beings whose secrets they could not discover.

Jacques, South Africa. 11 May 2015

A cult classic

Region details

Blu-ray Region A

Region A - Includes most North, Central and South American countries and South-east Asian countries including the Republic of China (Taiwan), Hong Kong, Japan and Korea.

R 215

Shop by Department